Université de Neuchâtel

The role of abscisic acid and water stress in root herbivore-induced leaf resistance

Erb, Matthias ; Köllner, Tobias G. ; Degenhardt, Jörg ; Zwahlen, Claudia ; Hibbard, Bruce E. ; Turlings, Ted C. J.

In: New Phytologist, 2011, vol. 189, no. 1, p. 308-320

Herbivore-induced systemic resistance occurs in many plants and is commonly assumed to be adaptive. The mechanisms triggered by leaf-herbivores that lead to systemic resistance are largely understood, but it remains unknown how and why root herbivory also increases resistance in leaves. To resolve this, we investigated the mechanism by which the root herbivore Diabrotica...

Université de Neuchâtel

Attractiveness of Constitutive and Herbivore-Induced Sesquiterpene Blends of Maize to the Parasitic Wasp Cotesia marginiventris (Cresson)

Fontana, Anna ; Held, Matthias ; Fantaye, Chalie A. ; Turlings, Ted C. J. ; Degenhardt, Jörg ; Gershenzon, Jonathan

In: Journal of Chemical Ecology, 2011, vol. 37, no. 6, p. 582-591

Plant volatile compounds induced by herbivore attack have been demonstrated to provide a signal to herbivore enemies such as parasitic wasps that use these volatiles to locate their hosts. However, in addition to herbivore-induced volatiles, plants often release volatiles constitutively. We assessed the interaction between herbivore-induced and constitutively released volatiles of maize in the...

Université de Neuchâtel

Modification of plant resistance and metabolism by above- and belowground herbivores

Erb, Matthias ; Turlings, Théodor (Dir.)

Thèse de doctorat : Université de Neuchâtel, 2009 ; Th. 2084.

Plants are often attacked by above- and belowground herbivores. As a result, they have evolved defense mechanisms to protect both their roots and shoot. However, physiological processes in roots and shoots are tightly connected, and attack of one of these plant parts can dramatically alter primary and secondary metabolism of the other (chapter 1). It is therefore important to understand how the...

Université de Neuchâtel

Induction of systemic acquired resistance in Zea mays also enhances the plant’s attractiveness to parasitoids

Rostás, Michael ; Turlings, Ted C. J.

In: Biological Control, 2008, vol. 46, no. 2, p. 178-186

Plants under attack by caterpillars emit volatile compounds that attract the herbivore’s natural enemies. In maize, the caterpillar-induced production of volatiles involves the phytohormone jasmonic acid (JA). In contrast, pathogen attack usually up-regulates the salicylic acid (SA)-pathway and results in systemic acquired resistance (SAR) against plant diseases. Activation of the SA-pathway...

Université de Neuchâtel

Fungal Infection Reduces Herbivore-Induced Plant Volatiles of Maize but does not Affect Naïve Parasitoids

Rostás, Michael ; Ton, Jurriaan ; Mauch-Mani, Brigitte ; Turlings, Ted C. J.

In: Journal of Chemical Ecology, 2006, vol. 32, no. 9, p. 1897-1909

Plants attacked by insects release volatile compounds that attract the herbivores' natural enemies. This so-called indirect defense is plastic and may be affected by an array of biotic and abiotic factors. We investigated the effect of fungal infection as a biotic stress agent on the emission of herbivore-induced volatiles and the possible consequences for the attraction of two parasitoid...

Université de Neuchâtel

The Role of Indole and Other Shikimic Acid Derived Maize Volatiles in the Attraction of Two Parasitic Wasps

D'Alessandro, Marco ; Held, Matthias ; Triponez, Yann ; Turlings, Ted C. J.

In: Journal of Chemical Ecology, 2006, vol. 32, no. 2, p. 2733-2748

After herbivore attack, plants release a plethora of different volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which results in odor blends that are attractive to predators and parasitoids of these herbivores. VOCs in the odor blends emitted by maize plants (Zea mays) infested by lepidopteran larvae are well characterized. They are derived from at least three different biochemical pathways, but the...

Université de Neuchâtel

Induction of Volatile Emissions in Maize by Different Larval Instars of Spodoptera littoralis

Gouinguené, Sandrine ; Alborn, Hans ; Turlings, Ted C. J.

In: Journal of Chemical Ecology, 2003, vol. 29, p. 145 - 162

Maize plants under attack by caterpillars emit a specific blend of volatiles that is highly attractive to parasitic wasps. The release of these signals is induced by elicitors in the caterpillar regurgitant. Studies suggest that plants respond differently to different herbivore species and even to different herbivore stages, thus providing parasitoids and predators with specific signals. We...