Working papers SES

Working papers SES
La collection des Working Papers SES est une série de cahiers de recherche présentant les différents travaux menés au sein de la Faculté des sciences économiques et sociales de l'Université de Fribourg (Suisse). Cette collection existe depuis 1980 et les thèmes abordés reflètent les différentes orientations scientifiques des membres de la Faculté: économie politique, gestion d'entreprise, informatique de gestion, méthodes quantitatives, sciences sociales et sciences des médias et de la communication. Le contenu de ces travaux n'engage que la responsabilité de leurs auteurs.

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Université de Fribourg

The swing voter's curse in social networks

Buechel, Berno ; Mechtenberg, Lydia

(Working Papers SES ; 485)

We study private communication in social networks prior to a majority vote on two alternative policies. Some (or all) agents receive a private imperfect signal about which policy is correct. They can, but need not, recommend a policy to their neighbors in the social network prior to the vote. We show theoretically and empirically that communication can undermine efficiency of the vote and hence...

Université de Fribourg

Direct and indirect effects based on difference-in-differences with an application to political preferences following the Vietnam draft lottery

Deuchert, Eva ; Huber, Martin ; Schelker, Mark

(Working Papers SES ; 473 (revised))

This paper proposes a difference-in-differences approach for disentangling a total treatment effect on some outcome into a direct effect as well as an indirect effect operating through a binary intermediate variable – or mediator – within strata defined upon how the mediator reacts to the treatment. Imposing random treatment assignment along with specific common trend (and further)...

Université de Fribourg

Simple Statistical Screens to Detect Bid Rigging

Imhof, David

(Working Papers SES ; 484)

The paper applies simple statistical screens to a bid-rigging cartel in Switzerland, and shows how well the screens detect it by capturing the impact of collusion on the discrete distribution of the bids. In case of bid rigging, the support for the distribution of the bids decreases involving a lower variance, illustrated by the coefficient of variance and the kurtosis statistic. Furthermore,...

Université de Fribourg

Econometric tests to detect bid-rigging cartels: does it work?

Imhof, David

(Working Papers SES ; 483)

This paper tests how well the method proposed by Bajari and Ye (2003) performs to detect bidrigging cartels. In the case investigated in this paper, the bid-rigging cartel rigged all contracts during the collusive period, and all firms participated to the bid-rigging cartel. The two econometric tests constructed by Bajari and Ye (2003) produce a high number of false negative results: the tests do...

Université de Fribourg

Nonparametric estimation of natural direct and indirect effects based on inverse probability weighting

Hsu, Yu-Chin ; Huber, Martin ; Lai, Tsung Chih

(Working Papers SES ; 482)

Using a sequential conditional independence assumption, this paper discusses fully nonparametric estimation of natural direct and indirect causal effects in causal mediation analysis based on inverse probability weighting. We propose estimators of the average indirect effect of a binary treatment, which operates through intermediate variables (or mediators) on the causal path between the...

Université de Fribourg

A framework for separating individual treatment effects from spillover, interaction, and general equilibrium effects

Huber, Martin ; Steinmayr, Andreas

(Working Papers SES ; 481)

This paper suggests a causal framework for disentangling individual level treatment effects and interference effects, i.e., general equilibrium, spillover, or interaction effects related to treatment distribution. Thus, the framework allows for a relaxation of the Stable Unit Treatment Value Assumption (SUTVA), which assumes away any form of treatment-dependent interference between study...

Université de Fribourg

Testing the validity of the compulsory schooling law instrument

Bolzern, Benjamin ; Huber, Martin

(Working Papers SES ; 480)

Changes in compulsory schooling laws have been proposed as an instrument for the endogenous choice of schooling. It has been argued that raising minimum schooling exogenously increases the educational attainment of a subset of pupils without directly affecting later life outcomes such as income or health. Using the method of Huber and Mellace (2015) and data from the Survey of Health, Ageing and...

Université de Fribourg

Evaluating local average and quantile treatment effects under endogeneity based on instruments : a review

Huber, Martin ; Wüthrich, Kaspar

(Working Papers SES ; 479)

This paper provides a review of methodological advancements in the evaluation of heterogeneous treatment effect models based on instrumental variable (IV) methods. We focus on models that achieve identification through a monotonicity assumption on the selection equation and analyze local average and quantile treatment effects for the subpopulation of compliers. We start with a comprehensive...

Université de Fribourg

A productive clash of cultures : injecting economics into leadership research

Zehnder, Christian ; Herz, Holger ; Bonardi, Jean-Philippe

(Working Papers SES ; 478)

Research on leadership in economics has developed in parallel to the literature in management and psychology and links between the fields have been sparse. Whereas modern leadership scholars mostly focus on transformational and related leadership styles, economists have mainly emphasized the role of contracts, control rights, and incentives. We argue that both fields could profit from enriching...

Université de Fribourg

What makes a price fair ? : An experimental study of transaction experience and endogenous fairness views

Herz, Holger ; Taubinsky, Dmitry‏

(Working Papers SES ; 477)

People’s fairness preferences are an important constraint for what constitutes an acceptable economic transaction, yet little is known about how these preferences are formed. In this paper, we provide clean evidence that previous transactions play an important role in shaping perceptions of fairness. Buyers used to high market prices, for example, are more likely to perceive high prices as fair...