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Consortium of Swiss Academic Libraries

Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) affect cell physiology and cell architecture

Kaiser, Jean-Pierre ; Wick, Peter ; Manser, Pius ; Spohn, Philipp ; Bruinink, Arie

In: Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine, 2008, vol. 19, no. 4, p. 1523-1527

Accès public à partir du 1 nov. 2019
Consortium of Swiss Academic Libraries

Advanced human in vitro models to assess metal oxide nanoparticle-cell interactions

Wick, Peter ; Grafmueller, Stefanie ; Petri-Fink, Alke ; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara

In: MRS Bulletin, 2014, vol. 39, no. 11, p. 984-989

Université de Fribourg

Human asthmatic bronchial cells are more susceptible to subchronic repeated exposures of aerosolized carbon nanotubes at occupationally relevant doses than healthy cells

Chortarea, Savvina ; Barosova, Hana ; Clift, Martin James David ; Wick, Peter ; Petri-Fink, Alke ; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara

In: ACS Nano, 2017, p. -

Although acute pulmonary toxicity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has been extensively investigated, the knowledge of potential health effects following chronic occupational exposure is currently limited and based only upon in vivo approaches. Our aim was to realistically mimic subchronic inhalation of multiwalled CNTs (MWCNTs) in vitro, using the air–liquid interface cell exposure (ALICE)...

Université de Fribourg

A comparative study of different in vitro lung cell culture systems to assess the most beneficial tool for screening the potential adverse effects of carbon nanotubes

Clift, Martin J. D. ; Endes, Carola ; Vanhecke, Dimitri ; Wick, Peter ; Gehr, Peter ; Schins, Roel P. F. ; Petri-Fink, Alke ; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara

In: Toxicological Sciences, 2014, vol. 137, no. 1, p. 55–64

To determine the potential inhalatory risk posed by carbon nanotubes (CNTs), a tier-based approach beginning with an in vitro assessment must be adopted. The purpose of this study therefore was to compare 4 commonly used in vitro systems of the human lung (human blood monocyte-derived macrophages [MDM] and monocyte-derived dendritic cells [MDDC], 16HBE14o- epithelial cells, and...

Université de Fribourg

Can the Ames test provide an insight into nano-object mutagenicity? Investigating the interaction between nano-objects and bacteria

Clift, Martin J. D. ; Raemy, David O. ; Endes, Carola ; Ali, Zulqurnain ; Lehmann, Andrea D. ; Brandenberger, Christina ; Petri-Fink, Alke ; Wick, Peter ; Parak, Wolfgang J. ; Gehr, Peter ; Schins, Roel P. F. ; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara

In: Nanotoxicology, 2013, vol. 7, no. 8, p. 1373–1385

The aim of this study was to assess the interaction of a series of well characterised nano-objects with the Gram negative bacterium Salmonella typhimurium, and how such an interaction may relate to the potential mutagenicity of nano-objects. Transmission electron microscopy showed that nano-objects (Au-PMA-ATTO NPs, CeO₂ NPs, SWCNTs and MWCNTs), as well as CAFs entered S....

Université de Fribourg

Human epithelial cells in vitro – Are they an advantageous tool to help understand the nanomaterial-biological barrier interaction?

Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara ; Clift, Martin J.D. ; Jud, Corinne ; Fink, Alke ; Wick, Peter

In: Euro Nanotox Letters, 2012, vol. 4, no. 01, p. 1-20

The human body can be exposed to nanomaterials through a variety of different routes. As nanomaterials get in contact with the skin, the gastrointestinal tract, and the respiratory tract, these biological compartments are acting as barriers to the passage of nano-sized materials into the organism. These structural and functional barriers are provided by the epithelia serving as an interface...

Université de Fribourg

Investigating the interaction of cellulose nanofibers derived from cotton with a sophisticated 3D human lung cell coculture

Clift, Martin J. D. ; Foster, E. Johan ; Vanhecke, Dimitri ; Studer, Daniel ; Wick, Peter ; Gehr, Peter ; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara ; Weder, Christoph

In: Biomacromolecules, 2011, vol. 12, no. 10, p. 3666–3673

Cellulose nanofibers are an attractive component of a broad range of nanomaterials. Their intriguing mechanical properties and low cost, as well as the renewable nature of cellulose make them an appealing alternative to carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which may pose a considerable health risk when inhaled. Little is known, however, concerning the potential toxicity of aerosolized cellulose nanofibers....