Working papers SES

Working papers SES
The Working Papers SES collection is a series of research papers authored by members of the Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences of the University of Fribourg (Switzerland). This series exists since 1980 and the themes investigated reflect the different scientific orientations of the Faculty: economics, business administration, computer management, quantitative methods, social sciences and media and communication sciences. The contents of the research papers are the sole responsibility of their authors.

Refine my results

Institution

Language

Université de Fribourg

Direct and indirect effects of continuous treatments based on generalized propensity score weighting

Hsu, Yu-Chin ; Huber, Martin ; Lee, Ying-Ying ; Pipoz, Layal

(Working papers SES ; 495)

This paper proposes semi- and nonparametric methods for disentangling the total causal effect of a continuous treatment on an outcome variable into its natural direct effect and the indirect effect that operates through one or several intermediate variables or mediators. Our approach is based on weighting observations by the inverse of two versions of the generalized propensity score (GPS),...

Université de Fribourg

The causalweight package for causal inference in R

Bodory, Hugo ; Huber, Martin

(Working Papers SES ; 493)

We describe R package “causalweight” for causal inference based on inverse probability weighting (IPW). The “causalweight” package offers a range of semiparametric methods for treatment or impact evaluation and mediation analysis, which incorporates intermediate outcomes for investigating causal mechanisms. Depending on the method, identification relies on selection on observables ...

Université de Fribourg

Instrument-based estimation with binarized treatments : issues and tests for the exclusion restriction

Andresen, Martin Eckhoff ; Huber, Martin

(Working Papers SES ; 492)

When estimating local average and marginal treatment effects using instrumental variables (IV), multivalued endogenous treatments are frequently binarized based on a specific threshold in treatment support. However, such binarization introduces a violation of the IV exclusion if (i) the IV affects the multivalued treatment within support areas below and/or above the threshold and (ii) such...

Université de Fribourg

Family firms and financial analyst activity

Eugster, Nicolas

(Working Papers SES ; 491)

This paper examines the relationship between ownership structure, analyst coverage, and forecast error for the entire population of non-financial companies listed on the Swiss Exchange for the period 2003-2013. The results show a negative association between concentrated ownership and analyst coverage for both family firms and firms held by a nonfamily blockholder. Furthermore, forecasts of...

Université de Fribourg

Founding family ownership, stock market returns, and agency problems

Eugster, Nicolas ; Isakov, Dušan

(Working Papers SES ; 490)

This paper explores the relationship between founding family ownership and stock market returns. Using the entire population of non-financial firms listed on the Swiss stock market for 2003–2013, we find that the stock returns of family firms are significantly higher than those of non-family firms after adjusting the returns for different risk factors and firm characteristics. Family firms...

Université de Fribourg

Including covariates in the regression discontinuity design

Frölich, Markus ; Huber, Martin

(Working Papers SES ; 489)

This paper proposes a fully nonparametric kernel method to account for observed covariates in regression discontinuity designs (RDD), which may increase precision of treatment effect estimation. It is shown that conditioning on covariates reduces the asymptotic variance and allows estimating the treatment effect at the rate of one-dimensional nonparametric regression, irrespective of the...

Université de Fribourg

Peer effects on perseverance

Buechel, Berno ; Mechtenberg, Lydia ; Petersen, Julia

(Working Papers SES ; 488)

Successful performance – be it in school, at the job, or in sports activities – requires perseverance, i.e., persistent work on a demanding task. We investigate in a controlled laboratory experiment how an individual’s social environment affects perseverance. We find evidence for two kinds of peer effects: being observed by a peer can serve as a commitment device, while observing a peer can...

Université de Fribourg

Combining experimental evidence with machine learning to assess anti-corruption educational campaigns among Russian university students

Denisova-Schmidt, Elena ; Huber, Martin ; Leontyeva, Elvira ; Solovyeva, Anna

(Working Papers SES ; 487)

This paper examines how anti-corruption educational campaigns affect the attitudes of Russian university students towards corruption and academic integrity. About 2,000 survey participants were randomly assigned to one of four different information materials (brochures or videos) about the negative consequences of corruption or to a control group. Using machine learning to detect effect...

Université de Fribourg

The strength of weak leaders - an experiment on social influence and social learning in teams

Buechel, Berno ; Klössner, Stefan ; Lochmüller, Martin ; Rauhut, Heiko

(Working Papers SES ; 486)

We investigate how the selection process of a leader affects team performance with respect to social learning. We use a lab experiment in which an incentivized guessing task is repeated in a star network with the leader at the center. Leader selection is either based on competence, on self-confidence, or made at random. Teams with random leaders do not underperform compared to rather competent...

Université de Fribourg

The swing voter's curse in social networks

Buechel, Berno ; Mechtenberg, Lydia

(Working Papers SES ; 485)

We study private communication in social networks prior to a majority vote on two alternative policies. Some (or all) agents receive a private imperfect signal about which policy is correct. They can, but need not, recommend a policy to their neighbors in the social network prior to the vote. We show theoretically and empirically that communication can undermine efficiency of the vote and hence...