Université de Fribourg

Cardiovascular and orthostatic responses to a festive meal associated with alcohol in young men

Sarafian, Delphine ; Charrière, Nathalie ; Maufrais, Claire ; Montani, Jean-Pierre

In: Frontiers in Physiology, 2019, vol. 10, p. -

Aim: Sharing a festive meal associated with alcohol is quite common. While the cardiovascular changes occurring after meal ingestion of different nutrient composition has been well-established, the effects of ingesting a festive versus a standard meal accompanied with alcohol are less clear. Here, we compared the postprandial hemodynamics, cutaneous and psychomotor performance responses after...

Université de Fribourg

Early and late cardiovascular and metabolic responses to mixed wine: effect of drink temperature

Sarafian, Delphine ; Maufrais, Claire ; Montani, Jean-Pierre

In: Frontiers in Physiology, 2018, vol. 9, p. -

Aim: Red wine is usually ingested as an unmixed drink. However, mixtures of wine with juices and/or sucrose (mixed wine) are becoming more and more popular and could be ingested at either cold or hot temperature. Although the temperature effects on the cardiovascular system have been described for water and tea, with greater energy expenditure (EE) and lower cardiac workload with a colder...

Université de Fribourg

Cardiovascular and metabolic responses to the ingestion of caffeinated herbal tea: drink it hot or cold?

Maufrais, Claire ; Sarafian, Delphine ; Dulloo, Abdul ; Montani, Jean-Pierre

In: Frontiers in Physiology, 2018, vol. 9, p. -

Tea is usually consumed at two temperatures (as hot tea or as iced tea). However, the importance of drink temperature on the cardiovascular system and on metabolism has not been thoroughly investigated. The purpose of this study was to compare the cardiovascular, metabolic and cutaneous responses to the ingestion of caffeinated herbal tea (Yerba Mate) at cold or hot temperature in healthy...

Université de Fribourg

The influence of gender and anthropometry on haemodynamic status at rest and in response to graded incremental head-up tilt in young, healthy adults

Sarafian, Delphine ; Miles-Chan, Jennifer L.

In: Frontiers in Physiology, 2017, vol. 7, p. -

The body's ability to rapidly and appropriately regulate blood pressure in response to changing physiological demand is a key feature of a healthy cardiovascular system. Passively tilting the body, thereby changing central blood volume, is a well-recognized and controlled method of evaluating this ability. However, such studies usually involve single tilt angles, or intermittent tilting...

Université de Fribourg

Sitting comfortably versus lying down: Is there really a difference in energy expenditure?

Miles-Chan, Jennifer Lynn ; Sarafian, Delphine ; Montani, Jean-Pierre ; Schutz, Yves ; Dulloo, Abdul G.

In: Clinical Nutrition, 2014, vol. 33, no. 1, p. 175–178

Background and aims: Energy expenditure (EE) during sitting is widely assumed to be higher than that while lying down, but supporting evidence is equivocal. Despite this, resting EE in the sitting position is often used as a proxy for basal metabolic rate. Here we investigate whether EE differs in the comfortable seated position compared to supine (lying) position.Methods: EE and respiratory...

Université de Fribourg

Heterogeneity in the energy cost of posture maintenance during standing relative to sitting: phenotyping according to magnitude and time-Course

Miles-Chan, Jennifer L. ; Sarafian, Delphine ; Montani, Jean-Pierre ; Schutz, Yves ; Dulloo, Abdul G.

In: PLoS ONE, 2013, vol. 8, no. 5, p. e65827

Background: Reducing sitting-time may decrease risk of disease and increase life-span. In the search for approaches to reduce sitting-time, research often compares sitting to standing and ambulation, but the energetic cost of standing alone versus sitting is equivocal, with large variation in reported mean values (0% to > 20% increase in energy expenditure (EE) during standing).Objective: To...

Université de Fribourg

A role for adipose tissue de novo lipogenesis in glucose homeostasis during catch-up growth : a randle cycle favoring fat storage

Marcelino, Helena ; Veyrat-Durebex, Christelle ; Summermatter, Serge ; Sarafian, Delphine ; Miles-Chan, Jennifer ; Arsenijevic, Denis ; Zani, Fabio ; Montani, Jean-Pierre ; Seydoux, Josiane ; Solinas, Giovanni ; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, Françoise ; Dulloo, Abdul G.

In: Diabetes, 2013, vol. 62, no. 2, p. 362-372

Catch-up growth, a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, is characterized by hyperinsulinemia and accelerated body fat recovery. Using a rat model of semistarvation-refeeding that exhibits catch-up fat, we previously reported that during refeeding on a low-fat diet, glucose tolerance is normal but insulin-dependent glucose utilization is decreased in skeletal muscle and increased in adipose tissue,...