Faculté des sciences

Phenotypic structure of Pseudomonas populations is altered under elevated pCO2 in the rhizosphere of perennial grasses

Tarnawski, Sonia Estelle ; Hamelin, Jérôme ; Jossi, M. ; Aragno, Michel ; Fromin, Nathalie

In: Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 2006, vol. 38, p. 1193-1201

The increasing atmospheric CO2 content (pCO2) is likely to modify the ecosystem functioning including rhizosphere bacteria that are directly dependent on rhizodeposition. This may include alteration of Pseudomonas populations that display phenotypic traits in relation with plant fitness. In the present study, 1228 Pseudomonas strains were isolated from the... Plus

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    Summary
    The increasing atmospheric CO2 content (pCO2) is likely to modify the ecosystem functioning including rhizosphere bacteria that are directly dependent on rhizodeposition. This may include alteration of Pseudomonas populations that display phenotypic traits in relation with plant fitness. In the present study, 1228 Pseudomonas strains were isolated from the non-rhizosphere soil, rhizosphere soil and root fractions of perennial grassland systems: Lolium perenne and Molinia coerulea. Both plants were grown under ambient (36 Pa) and elevated (60 Pa) pCO2 in the Swiss Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) system. Pseudomonas spp. were tested for their ability to produce auxin, siderophores and hydrogen cyanide, and to dissimilate nitrate. No effect of root proximity and elevated pCO2 was observed on the proportions of auxin producers. For L. perenne and M. coerulea, siderophore and hydrogen cyanide Pseudomonas producers were stimulated in the root fraction. In contrast lower frequencies of nitrate reducers were observed in the root fraction compared to non-rhizosphere soil. The frequencies of siderophore producers and nitrate dissimilating strains were higher, and those of hydrogen cyanide producers lower, under elevated pCO2 for L. perenne. This alteration of the phenotypic structure of Pseudomonas guild in the root fraction is discussed in relation with the physico-biochemical modifications of the rhizosphere condition via rhizodeposition and environmental changes occurring under elevated pCO2.