Faculté des sciences et techniques de l'ingénieur STI, Section d'électricité, Institut de traitement des signaux ITS (Laboratoire de traitement des signaux 5 LTS5)

Atlas-based segmentation and classification of magnetic resonance brain images

Bach Cuadra, Meritxell ; Thiran, Jean-Philippe (Dir.)

Thèse sciences Ecole polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne EPFL : 2003 ; no 2875.

Ajouter à la liste personnelle
    Summary
    A wide range of different image modalities can be found today in medical imaging. These modalities allow the physician to obtain a non-invasive view of the internal organs of the human body, such as the brain. All these three dimensional images are of extreme importance in several domains of medicine, for example, to detect pathologies, follow the evolution of these pathologies, prepare and realize surgical planning with, or without, the help of robot systems or for statistical studies. Among all the medical image modalities, Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging has become of great interest in many research areas due to its great spatial and contrast image resolution. It is therefore perfectly suited for anatomic visualization of the human body such as deep structures and tissues of the brain. Medical image analysis is a complex task because medical images usually involve a large amount of data and they sometimes present some undesirable artifacts, as for instance the noise. However, the use of a priori knowledge in the analysis of these images can greatly simplify this task. This prior information is usually represented by the reference images or atlases. Modern brain atlases are derived from high resolution cryosections or in vivo images, single subject-based or population-based, and they provide detailed images that may be interactively and easily examined in their digital format in computer assisted diagnosis or intervention. Then, in order to efficiently combine all this information, a battery of registration techniques is emerging based on transformations that bring two medical images into voxel-to-voxel correspondence. One of the main aims of this thesis is to outline the importance of including prior knowledge in the medical image analysis framework and the indispensable role of registration techniques in this task. In order to do that, several applications using atlas information are presented. First, the atlas-based segmentation in normal anatomy is shown as it is a key application of medical image analysis using prior knowledge. It consists of registering the brain images derived from different subjects and modalities within the atlas coordinate system to improve the localization and delineation of the structures of interest. However, the use of an atlas can be problematic in some particular cases where some structures, for instance a tumor or a sulcus, exists in the subject and not in the atlas. In order to solve this limitation of the atlases, a new atlas-based segmentation method for pathological brains is proposed in this thesis as well as a validation method to assess this new approach. Results show that deep structures of the brain can still be efficiently segmented using an anatomic atlas even if they are largely deformed because of a lesion. The importance of including a priori knowledge is also presented in the application of brain tissue classification. The prior information represented by the tissue templates can be included in a brain tissue segmentation approach thanks to the registration techniques. This is another important issue presented in this thesis and it is analyzed through a comparative study of several non-supervised classification techniques. These methods are selected to represent the whole range of prior information that can be used in the classification process: the image intensity, the local spatial model, and the anatomical priors. Results show that the registration between the subject and the tissue templates allows the use of prior information but the accuracy of both the prior information and the registration highly influence the performance of the classification techniques. Another aim of this thesis is to present the concept of dynamic medical image analysis, in which the prior knowledge and the registration techniques are also of main importance. Actually, many medical image applications have the objective of statically analyzing one single image, as for instance in the case of atlas-based segmentation or brain tissue classification. But in other cases the implicit idea of changes detection is present. Intuitively, since the human body is changing continuously, we would like to do the image analysis from a dynamic point of view by detecting these changes, and by comparing them afterwards with templates to know if they are normal. The need of such approaches is even more evident in the case of many brain pathologies such as tumors, multiple sclerosis or degenerative diseases. In these cases, the key point is not only to detect but also to quantify and even characterize the evolving pathology. The evaluation of lesion variations over time can be very useful, for instance in the pharmaceutical research and clinical follow up. Of course, a sequence of images is needed in order to do such an analysis. Two approaches dealing with the idea of change detection are proposed as the last (but not least) issue presented in this work. The first one consists of performing a static analysis of each image forming the data set and, then, of comparing them. The second one consists of analyzing the non-rigid transformation between the sequence images instead of the images itself. Finally, both static and dynamic approaches are illustrated with a potential application: the cortical degeneration study is done using brain tissue segmentation, and the study of multiple sclerosis lesion evolution is performed by non-rigid deformation analysis. In conclusion, the importance of including a priori information encoded in the brain atlases in medical image analysis has been put in evidence with a wide range of possible applications. In the same way, the key role of registration techniques is shown not only as an efficient way to combine all the medical image modalities but also as a main element in the dynamic medical image analysis.
    Summary
    A wide range of different image modalities can be found today in medical imaging. These modalities allow the physician to obtain a non-invasive view of the internal organs of the human body, such as the brain. All these three dimensional images are of extreme importance in several domains of medicine, for example, to detect pathologies, follow the evolution of these pathologies, prepare and realize surgical planning with, or without, the help of robot systems or for statistical studies. Among all the medical image modalities, Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging has become of great interest in many research areas due to its great spatial and contrast image resolution. It is therefore perfectly suited for anatomic visualization of the human body such as deep structures and tissues of the brain. Medical image analysis is a complex task because medical images usually involve a large amount of data and they sometimes present some undesirable artifacts, as for instance the noise. However, the use of a priori knowledge in the analysis of these images can greatly simplify this task. This prior information is usually represented by the reference images or atlases. Modern brain atlases are derived from high resolution cryosections or in vivo images, single subject-based or population-based, and they provide detailed images that may be interactively and easily examined in their digital format in computer assisted diagnosis or intervention. Then, in order to efficiently combine all this information, a battery of registration techniques is emerging based on transformations that bring two medical images into voxel-to-voxel correspondence. One of the main aims of this thesis is to outline the importance of including prior knowledge in the medical image analysis framework and the indispensable role of registration techniques in this task. In order to do that, several applications using atlas information are presented. First, the atlas-based segmentation in normal anatomy is shown as it is a key application of medical image analysis using prior knowledge. It consists of registering the brain images derived from different subjects and modalities within the atlas coordinate system to improve the localization and delineation of the structures of interest. However, the use of an atlas can be problematic in some particular cases where some structures, for instance a tumor or a sulcus, exists in the subject and not in the atlas. In order to solve this limitation of the atlases, a new atlas-based segmentation method for pathological brains is proposed in this thesis as well as a validation method to assess this new approach. Results show that deep structures of the brain can still be efficiently segmented using an anatomic atlas even if they are largely deformed because of a lesion. The importance of including a priori knowledge is also presented in the application of brain tissue classification. The prior information represented by the tissue templates can be included in a brain tissue segmentation approach thanks to the registration techniques. This is another important issue presented in this thesis and it is analyzed through a comparative study of several non-supervised classification techniques. These methods are selected to represent the whole range of prior information that can be used in the classification process: the image intensity, the local spatial model, and the anatomical priors. Results show that the registration between the subject and the tissue templates allows the use of prior information but the accuracy of both the prior information and the registration highly influence the performance of the classification techniques. Another aim of this thesis is to present the concept of dynamic medical image analysis, in which the prior knowledge and the registration techniques are also of main importance. Actually, many medical image applications have the objective of statically analyzing one single image, as for instance in the case of atlas-based segmentation or brain tissue classification. But in other cases the implicit idea of changes detection is present. Intuitively, since the human body is changing continuously, we would like to do the image analysis from a dynamic point of view by detecting these changes, and by comparing them afterwards with templates to know if they are normal. The need of such approaches is even more evident in the case of many brain pathologies such as tumors, multiple sclerosis or degenerative diseases. In these cases, the key point is not only to detect but also to quantify and even characterize the evolving pathology. The evaluation of lesion variations over time can be very useful, for instance in the pharmaceutical research and clinical follow up. Of course, a sequence of images is needed in order to do such an analysis. Two approaches dealing with the idea of change detection are proposed as the last (but not least) issue presented in this work. The first one consists of performing a static analysis of each image forming the data set and, then, of comparing them. The second one consists of analyzing the non-rigid transformation between the sequence images instead of the images itself. Finally, both static and dynamic approaches are illustrated with a potential application: the cortical degeneration study is done using brain tissue segmentation, and the study of multiple sclerosis lesion evolution is performed by non-rigid deformation analysis. In conclusion, the importance of including a priori information encoded in the brain atlases in medical image analysis has been put in evidence with a wide range of possible applications. In the same way, the key role of registration techniques is shown not only as an efficient way to combine all the medical image modalities but also as a main element in the dynamic medical image analysis.
    Summary
    Resumen Hoy en día existen muchas modalidades de imágenes médicas digitales que permiten a los médicos el estudio in vivo de los órganos del cuerpo humano, como por ejemplo del cerebro. Estas imágenes son muy útiles en muchos campos de la medicina como por ejemplo en la detección, seguimiento y estudio de patologías, en la preparación y realización de operaciones quirúrgicas asistidas por ordenador o en estudios estadísticos. De entre todos los tipos de imágenes medicas, destaca la imagen de Resonancia Magnética (RM) por su alta resolución espacial, su gran variedad de posibles contrastes y su inocuidad al no utilizar radiación ionizante. Estas características hacen que la imagen por RM sea muy adecuada para la visualización anatómica del cuerpo humano, por ejemplo para visualizar las estructuras y los tejidos del cerebro. El análisis de imágenes médicas es una tarea compleja ya que normalmente estas imágenes consituyen grandes volúmenes de datos y, además, presentan ruido y otros artefactos de la imagen como los cambios de iluminación. Sin embargo, la inclusión de información a priori en el análisis de estas imágenes puede facilitar mucho su estudio. La información a priori está normalmente representada por las imágenes de referencia o atlas que determinan un espacio concreto en el cual se describe la anatomía, por ejemplo, del cerebro humano. Actualmente los atlas del cerebro (creados a partir de secciones criogénicas o de imágenes in vivo, basados en un solo sujeto o en toda una población) proporcionan imágenes digitales muy detalladas que pueden ser examinadas interactiva y fácilmente en el diagnostico de tratamientos y planificación de los mismos por ordenador. En consecuencia, para poder combinar de manera eficiente toda la información contenida en los distintos tipos de imágenes médicas surgen las técnicas de registro* que proporcionan las transformaciones geométricas que sitúan dos imágenes en correspondencia anatómica voxel a voxel. Uno de los objetivos principales de esta tesis es remarcar la importancia de incluir información a priori en el proceso de análisis de imágenes médicas así como resaltar el papel indispensable de los métodos de registro en este proceso. Para demostrarlo, presentamos distintas aplicaciones que utilizan atlas. Primero, presentamos la aplicación de segmentación basada en atlas en sujetos con anatomía normal ya que es una de las aplicaciones principales que incluyen información a priori. La segmentación basada en atlas consiste en registrar una o varias imágenes del cerebro en el sistema de referencia del atlas para facilitar la localización y segmentación de las estructuras de interés. Sin embargo, el uso del atlas está limitado en algunos casos donde puede haber estructuras, como un tumor o un sulcus, que estén presentes en el paciente pero no en el atlas. Para solventar este problema, se propone un nuevo método de segmentación basado en atlas para cerebros patológicos así como un método para su validación. Los resultados obtenidos demuestran que las estructuras de interés del cerebro se pueden segmentar utilizando la información contenida en un atlas aunque estén muy deformadas debido a una lesión. La importancia de la utilización de la información a priori se demuestra también en la clasificación de los distintos tejidos del cerebro. La información a priori contenida en los atlas de tejidos del cerebro puede ser utilizada por los métodos de clasificación gracias al registro de imágenes. ésta es también una aplicación importante y se presenta a través del estudio comparativo de varias técnicas de clasificación no supervisadas. Los métodos de clasificación analizados han sido elegidos de manera que representen la diversidad de información a priori que se puede utilizar, es decir, la intensidad de la imagen, la información local espacial y la información global contenida en los atlas. Los resultados obtenidos demuestran que el uso de atlas es posible gracias a las técnicas de registro pero que la calidad de la clasificación depende mucho de la precisión del método de registro y de la calidad de la información a priori utilizados. El tercer objetivo de esta tesis es presentar el concepto de análisis dinámico de las imágenes médicas, en el cual, la información a priori y los métodos de registro siguen siendo de mucha importancia. En realidad, muchas aplicaciones de las imágenes medicas tienen como objetivo el análisis estático de una imagen como, por ejemplo, en el caso de la segmentación basada en atlas o en la clasificación de tejidos del cerebro. Pero en otros casos la idea de detección de cambios es implícita. Intuitivamente, ya que en el cuerpo se producen cambios continuamente, podríamos analizar las imágenes medicas desde un punto de vista dinámico, es decir, detectando los cambios que se producen y comparándolos con modelos de cambios para determinar si son normales. La necesidad de detección de cambios es aún más evidente en el estudio de ciertas patologías del cerebro como por ejemplo tumores, esclerosis múltiple o enfermedades degenerativas. En estos casos, la clave está no sólo en detectar sino también en cuantificar e incluso caracterizar la evolución de la lesión. Este tipo de estudios pueden ser muy útiles por ejemplo en la investigación farmacéutica o en el seguimiento clínico. Evidentemente, para realizar este tipo de estudios evolutivos se considera que se dispone de una secuencia de imágenes a distintos intervalos de tiempo. Dos métodos distintos que lidian con la idea de detección de cambios son presentados en esta tesis. El primero consiste en realizar el análisis estático de cada una de las imágenes que forman la secuencia y luego comparar los resultados. El segundo método consiste en realizar el análisis de la transformación obtenida entre las imágenes de la secuencia, en vez de realizar el análisis de cada imagen. Finalmente, presentamos una aplicación potencial de cada uno de los métodos como ejemplo: el estudio de la degeneración cortical del cerebro que esta hecho a partir de la clasificación de tejidos y el estudio de la evolución de esclerosis múltiple que esta hecha a partir del análisis de la transformación obtenida por registro. En conclusión, se ha puesto en evidencia la importancia de considerar la información a priori de los atlas anatómicos del cerebro en el análisis de imágenes médicas en una gran variedad de aplicaciones. De la misma manera, el papel decisivo de los métodos de registro ha sido presentado no sólo como una manera eficiente de combinar las distintas modalidades de imágenes médicas sino también como un elemento importante en el análisis dinámico de las mismas. -------------------- * Anglicismo de registration.
    Résumé
    Dans le domaine de l'imagerie médicale il existe une grande variété de modalités d'images 3D qui permettent aux médecins d'obtenir une visualisation non invasive des organes du corps humain, comme par exemple du cerveau. Toutes ces modalités d'images sont très importantes dans divers domaines de la médicine comme par exemple pour détecter certaines pathologies, pour suivre l'évolution des ces pathologies, pour préparer et pour réaliser des opérations chirurgicales avec ou sans l'aide de systèmes robotiques ou même pour des études statistiques. Parmi toutes les modalités d'images médicales, l'Imagerie par Résonance Magnétique (IRM) est devenue très importante grâce à sa grande résolution spatiale et son fort contraste pour les tissues mous. L'IRM est donc très bien adaptée pour la visualisation anatomique du corps humain, par exemple des structures profondes ou des tissus du cerveau. L'analyse des images médicales est très complexe car ces images sont représentées par de grandes quantités de données et elles présentent parfois des effets non désirables comme le bruit. Cependant l'utilisation d'information a priori pendant le traitement d'images peut faciliter beaucoup leur analyse. Normalement, cette information a priori est représentée par les images dites de référence ou atlas, qui déterminent un espace commun ou l'anatomie humaine peut être précisément représent ée comme c'est le cas du cerveau. Aujourd'hui les atlas sont dérivés des images cryosectionées de grande résolution ou des images in vivo et ils sont basés sur un seul individu ou sur une population d'individus. Dans tous les cas, elles fournissent des images très détaillées qui peuvent être facilement analysées dans leur format digital pour des applications comme la vision et l'aide au diagnostic par ordinateur. Finalement, il existe une grande variété des techniques de recalage basées sur des transformations qui donnent une correspondance voxel-a-voxel des images et qui permettent de combiner très efficacement toutes les informations contenues dans les images médicales. Un des principaux objectifs de cette thèse c'est de souligner l'importance d'inclure dans l'analyse des images médicales l'information connue a priori et le rôle indispensable des techniques de recalage. Différentes applications qui utilisent l'information contenue dans des atlas sont présentées. Tout d'abord, la segmentation basée sur un atlas est présentée car c'est une application de pointe dans l'utilisation d'information a priori. Il s'agit de recaler des images du cerveau dérivées des différents individus ou modalités d'image avec un atlas qui permettra d'améliorer la localisation et segmentation des structures d'intérêt. Cependant, l'utilisation d'atlas et parfois limitée dans certains cas ou quelques structures, par exemple un sulcus ou une tumeur, sont présents dans le patient mais ne sont pas présents dans l'atlas. On propose dans ce travail une nouvelle méthode de segmentation basée sur un atlas dans les cas de cerveaux pathologiques ainsi qu'une méthode pour sa validation. Les résultats montrent que les structures profondes du cerveau peuvent encore être segmentées efficacement à l'aide d'un atlas même si elles ont été largement déformées par une lésion. La pertinence d'inclure l'information a priori est aussi présentée dans le cadre de la segmentation des tissus principaux du cerveau. L'information contenue dans les atlas des tissus peut être incluse dans la méthode de classification du cerveau grâce au recalage des images. Celle-ci est analysée grâce à une étude comparative des diverses techniques de classification non supervisées. Les méthodes étudiées ont été sélectionnées de façon à bien représenter toutes les informations a priori qui peuvent être incluses: l'intensité de l'image, le modèle spatial local, et les informations a priori anatomiques. Les résultats montrent que le recalage entre le sujet et les atlas des tissus permet l'utilisation des informations a priori mais que la précision des deux, recalage et information a priori, influence fortement la qualité finale de la classification. Un autre objectif de ce travail est de présenter le concept d'analyse dynamique des images médicales, ou l'information a priori et les techniques de recalage jouent aussi un rôle important. En fait, diverses applications de l'analyse d'image ont pour but d'étudier de façon statique une image. C'est le cas par exemple de la segmentation des images basée sur un atlas ou de la classification des tissus du cerveau. Mais dans d'autres cas, l'idée implicite de détection des changements est présente. Intuitivement, comme le corps humain change continuellement, on voudrait faire une analyse de façon dynamique, c'est à dire, détecter quels sont les changements qui se sont produit et, en les comparant avec des informations a priori sur les changements, pouvoir détecter s'il s'agit de changements normaux ou pathologiques. Le besoin de cette approche est encore plus évident dans les cas de certaines pathologies comme une tumeur, la sclérose en plaque ou les maladies dégénératives du cerveau. Dans ces cas, l'objectif ce n'est pas seulement de détecter la pathologie mais aussi de la quantifier et même de la caractériser. L'évaluation des variations de certaines lésions tout au long du temps permet d'avancer les recherches pharmaceutiques et un meilleur suivi clinique. Bien évidemment, de telles études ont besoin d'une séquence temporelle d'images du patient à traiter. Deux approches différentes sont présentées afin d'illustrer cette idée de détection des changements. La première consiste à faire une analyse statique de chaque image de la séquence et de comparer après les résultats. La deuxième est basée sur l'analyse de la transformation non rigide utilisée pour déformer une image de la séquence vers une autre. Les deux approches sont présentées à l'aide d'un exemple: l'étude de la dégénération du cortex du cerveau est fait grâce à la segmentation des tissus et l'étude de la sclérose en plaques est faite grâce à l'analyse de la déformation non rigide. En conclusion, l'importance d'utiliser l'information a priori contenue dans des atlas dans le domaine de l'analyse d'images médicales est présentée ainsi que ses applications. De même, le rôle décisif des techniques de recalage n'est pas seulement présenté comme une façon efficace de combiner les différents types d'images mais aussi comme un élément principal dans les approches d'analyse dynamiques des images médicales.