Faculté des sciences et de médecine

Are people with aphasia (pwa) involved in the creation of quality of life and aphasia impact-related questionnaires? A scoping review

Charalambous, Marina ; Kambanaros, Maria ; Annoni, Jean-Marie

In: Brain Sciences, 2020, vol. 10, no. 10, p. 688

Background: Quality of Life (QoL) questionnaires are used to describe the impact of aphasia on stroke survivors’ life. People with aphasia (PWA) are traditionally excluded from research, potentially leading to a mismatch between the factors chosen in the tools and the realistic needs of PWA. The purpose of this review was to determine the direct involvement of PWA in the creation of QoL and... More

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    Summary
    Background: Quality of Life (QoL) questionnaires are used to describe the impact of aphasia on stroke survivors’ life. People with aphasia (PWA) are traditionally excluded from research, potentially leading to a mismatch between the factors chosen in the tools and the realistic needs of PWA. The purpose of this review was to determine the direct involvement of PWA in the creation of QoL and aphasia impact-related questionnaires (AIR-Qs). Methods: A scoping review methodology was conducted by an expert librarian and two independent reviewers on health sciences based on the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Metanalyses extension for Scoping Reviews (PRISMA-ScR) protocol, through a literature search in five databases: Medline Complete, PubMed, PsychINFO, Scopus, and Google Scholar. Search terms included ‘stroke’, ‘people with aphasia’, ‘communication’, ‘well-being’, and ‘quality of life’. Results: Of 952 results, 20 studies met the eligibility criteria. Of these, only four AIR-Qs studies (20%) were found reporting the direct involvement of PWA, while no QoL tools did so. Evidence showed involvement in the creation phase of AIR-Q, mainly in a consultation role. Conclusions: There is an absence of a framework for conducting and reporting the involvement of PWA in qualitative participatory research studies, which limits effectiveness to promote equitable best practice in aphasia rehabilitation.