Faculté des sciences et de médecine

Training‐, muscle‐ and task‐specific up‐ and downregulation of cortical inhibitory processes

Taube, Wolfgang ; Gollhofer, Albert ; Lauber, Benedikt

In: European Journal of Neuroscience, 2020, vol. 51, no. 6, p. 1428–1440

Motor cortical contribution was shown to be important for balance control and for ballistic types of movements. However, little is known about the role of cortical inhibitory mechanisms and even less about long(er)‐term adaptations of these inhibitory processes. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the role of intracortical inhibition before and after four weeks of ... Mehr

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    Summary
    Motor cortical contribution was shown to be important for balance control and for ballistic types of movements. However, little is known about the role of cortical inhibitory mechanisms and even less about long(er)‐term adaptations of these inhibitory processes. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the role of intracortical inhibition before and after four weeks of explosive or balance training. Two groups of subjects participated for four weeks either in an explosive training programme of the plantar flexor muscles or in a balance training programme on unstable devices. Adaptations in short‐ interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) were assessed by applying paired‐pulse TMS to the soleus muscle during dynamic plantar flexions, balance perturbations and at rest. Furthermore, SICI was assessed for the untrained tibialis anterior muscle. The results show task‐, muscle‐ and group‐specific adaptations in SICI after the training (p = .021) with significantly increased SICI after balance training in the balance task and decreased SICI after explosive training in the ballistic task. The training also caused task‐ and group‐specific behavioural adaptations indicated by improved balance performance after balance training and increased ballistic performance after explosive training. There were no changes in SICI when measured at rest or in the untrained tibialis anterior muscle. This study shows that long(er)‐term training improves the ability to modulate cortical inhibitory processes in a task‐ and muscle‐ specific manner.