Faculté des sciences et de médecine

pH-responsive nano-self-assemblies of the anticancer drug 2-hydroxyoleic acid

Prajapati, Rama ; Gontsarik, Mark ; Yaghmur, Anan ; Salentinig, Stefan

In: Langmuir, 2019, vol. 35, no. 24, p. 7954–7961

pH-responsive lipid nanocarriers have the potential to selectively target the acidic extracellular pH environment of cancer tissues and may further improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutics by minimizing their toxic side-effects. Here, we present the design and characterization of pH-sensitive nano-self-assemblies of the poorly water-soluble anticancer drug 2-hydroxyoleic acid (2OHOA) with... Mehr

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    Summary
    pH-responsive lipid nanocarriers have the potential to selectively target the acidic extracellular pH environment of cancer tissues and may further improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutics by minimizing their toxic side-effects. Here, we present the design and characterization of pH-sensitive nano-self-assemblies of the poorly water-soluble anticancer drug 2-hydroxyoleic acid (2OHOA) with glycerol monooleate (GMO). pH- triggered nanostructural transformations from 2OHOA/GMO nanoparticles with an internal inverse hexagonal structure (hexosomes) at pH around 2.0–3.0, via nanocarriers with an internal inverse bicontinuous cubic structure (cubosomes) at pH 2.0–4.5, to vesicles at pH 4.5–7.4 were observed with synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering, and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy. ζ-potential measurements highlight that the pH-driven deprotonation of the carboxylic group of 2OHOA, and the resulting charge-repulsions at the lipid–water interface account for these nanostructural alterations. The study provides detailed insight into the pH-dependent self-assembly of 2OHOA with GMO in excess buffer at physiologically relevant pH values, and discusses the effects of pH alterations on modulating their nanostructure. The results may guide the further development of pH-responsive anticancer nanocarriers for the targeted delivery of chemotherapeutics to the local microenvironment of tumor cells.