Ecumenical Institute Bossey

Theological education for social transformation : a missiological analysis of core elements in the theology of John Samuel Pobee

Kaunda, Chammah Judex ; Ekué, Amélé Adamavi-Aho (Dir.) ; Chalamet, Christophe (Codir.)

Mémoire de Master Advanced Studies (MAS) : Conseil œcuménique des Églises, 2012.

The study is a critical analysis of John S. Pobee’s theological thoughts on theological education in Africa focusing on social transformation. It argues that that for theological education to become relevant in the African context, it must be informed by the daily existential experiences of African people on the grassroots. By utilising a missiological analytical research methodology, the study... Plus

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    Summary
    The study is a critical analysis of John S. Pobee’s theological thoughts on theological education in Africa focusing on social transformation. It argues that that for theological education to become relevant in the African context, it must be informed by the daily existential experiences of African people on the grassroots. By utilising a missiological analytical research methodology, the study has demonstrated that the mission of God is an all-embracing in which every Christian participates or struggles together with God in the humanization of the society. This means ecumenical imperative in theological education demands a new paradigm, which requires tools for social analysis and models for thinking theologically in order to occasion renewal in the Church for the purpose of social transformation. In this way theological education should be life centred and praxis-oriented. In other words, it is a way of critical participation in an on-going process of recreating and liberating work of God, in which human beings partner with God in the struggle for social transformation. This in itself calls for theological education in Africa, to complement the paradigm of Christocentric universalism with the paradigm of interrelatedness of all life. Finally, articulation of the notion of ecumenism within various African wisdom and philosophy must be perceived crucial for theological education. This is underpinned by an understanding that every human culture has categories and idioms in which the concept of ecumenism can be translated for contextual articulation. This implies that there is an urgent need for empirical studies in different African ethnic groups in order to retrieve indigenous concepts and metaphors of ecumenism.