Faculté des lettres et sciences humaines

Socialization : interactions between parents and children in everyday family life

Keel, Sara ; Clément, Fabrice (Dir.) ; Mondada, Lorenza (Codir.)

Thèse de doctorat : Université de Neuchâtel, 2012.

This thesis is part of an interdisciplinary research project on the socialization of preschoolers. By adopting a Conversation Analytic (CA) approach informed by Ethnomethodology (EM), it offers a study of the socialization process as it takes place within everyday parent-child interactions. Based on a large audio-visual corpus featuring footage of eight French-speaking families filmed extensively... Plus

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    Summary
    This thesis is part of an interdisciplinary research project on the socialization of preschoolers. By adopting a Conversation Analytic (CA) approach informed by Ethnomethodology (EM), it offers a study of the socialization process as it takes place within everyday parent-child interactions. Based on a large audio-visual corpus featuring footage of eight French-speaking families filmed extensively in their homes, the study focuses on recorded examples of young children initiating interactive sequences by producing evaluative turns, such as “that’s beautiful”, “(I) like that”, and “yuck”. By taking into account the interactants’ articulation of embodied resources – talk, gaze, and gesture – the study aims, on the one hand, to describe how young children manage to produce evaluative turns that make a response by the addressed parent relevant; and to evidence how, through their participation in everyday interaction, young children acquire communicative skills and a sense of themselves as effective social actors. On the other hand, it seeks to examine parents’ most frequent responses – agreements, disagreements, or questioning repeats – and to look at the implications of these responses for the further course of action. Looking at how children’s evaluative actions – as attempts to communicate their normative position, and their affective implication with respect to the surrounding world – are treated in turn by the parents, reveals the parents’ emic understanding of their children’s participation in evaluating the world they commonly inhabit. Finally, the study of interactively produced evaluative sequences also allows some new light to be shed on the ways in which parents and children achieve shared understanding, and how they deal with delicate issues of alignment/disalignment, as well as with matters related to their respective membership categories.