Faculté des lettres et sciences humaines

Simbología del poder en Lo que le toca al valor y príncipe de Orange, de Antonio Mira de Amescua

Sánchez Jiménez, Antonio

In: La voz de Clío: imágenes del poder en la comedia histórica del Siglo de Oro, 2012, p. 188-203

In Lo que le toca al valor y príncipe de Orange, Antonio Mira de Amescua dramatizes the murder of William of Orange, in the first phase of the Eighty Years’ War. In order to justify the tyrannicide, Mira first convincingly presents the voice of the enemies of Catholicism and Spain, but manages to dominate that voice by piling up negative imagery on those enemies, who the play presents... Plus

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    Summary
    In Lo que le toca al valor y príncipe de Orange, Antonio Mira de Amescua dramatizes the murder of William of Orange, in the first phase of the Eighty Years’ War. In order to justify the tyrannicide, Mira first convincingly presents the voice of the enemies of Catholicism and Spain, but manages to dominate that voice by piling up negative imagery on those enemies, who the play presents through compelling imagery as the incarnation of corrupt power, as a world upside down that the tyrannice will destroy. In addition, Mira associates this imagery of public policy to private debauchery, thereby linking the two actions of the play.