Faculté des sciences

Uncertainty propagation and global sensitivity analysis in multi-layered hydrogeological models of flow and lifetime expectancy

Deman, Grégory ; Perrochet, Pierre (Dir.) ; Kerrou, Jaouher (Codir.)

Thèse de doctorat : Université de Neuchâtel, 2015.

The main focus of this thesis is the uncertainty propagation (UP) and global sensitivity analysis (GSA) in complex hydrogeological numerical models. Various methods are presented with applications on numerical models for the groundwater flow and mean lifetime expectancy (MLE) in the scope of Andra's (French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency) project for the geological disposal of... Plus

Ajouter à la liste personnelle
    Summary
    The main focus of this thesis is the uncertainty propagation (UP) and global sensitivity analysis (GSA) in complex hydrogeological numerical models. Various methods are presented with applications on numerical models for the groundwater flow and mean lifetime expectancy (MLE) in the scope of Andra's (French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency) project for the geological disposal of high-level and intermediate-level long-lived radioactive wastes in a highly impermeable layer from Callovo-Oxfordian age (COX) in France.
    A state of the art is provided for the theory of uncertainty propagation and for the methodologies of sensitivity analyses in a broad sense. Methods for UP are provided from 2-levels Factorial Designs to quasi-random samplings. GSA techniques encompass screening methods such as the Morris Measures and the Derivative-based Global Sensitivity Measures (DGSM), and also the so-called Sobol' indices based upon the variance decomposition of the response of interest. Meta-modelling techniques such as polynomial regression and Polynomial Chaos Expansions (PCE) meta-models are employed as surrogate models for UP and GSA purpose at negligible computational-costs. A comparison of GSA techniques upon various complex analytical test-functions was undertaken with the purpose of determining a relevant method to be employed in the context of “screening” out unimportant variables in computer-intensive, high-dimensional models.
    A numerical model of groundwater flow and lifetime expectancy is employed for assessing the effect of uncertain advection-dispersion parameters and their spatial distributions upon the MLE from a target zone inside the domain. The model is a 2-dimensions synthetic cross-section of the eastern region of the Paris Basin (Meuse/Haute-Marne sector). This model was used as an exploratory tool for sensitivity analysis methods applied upon numerous sets of uncertain hydrodynamic and dispersion parameters in 15 layers. The uncertainty characterizing the permeability-porosity values in aquifer formations encompassing the COX have proved to add much of variability to the MLE calculated from the target zone. The model also served at exploring the effect of the spatial variability of permeability-porosity parameters in two main aquifer sequences on the groundwater flow rates and MLE in the model. The variabilities of the output responses are mainly due to the uncertainty upon the means and variances of the permeability-porosity distributions, as well as the longitudinal correlation lengths, in each sequence.
    Then, a 3-dimensions high-definition hydrogeological model representing the Meuse/Haute-Marne sector in the eastern region of the Paris Basin is a more comprehensive numerical model incorporating realistic geometries, fractures, heterogeneities and discontinuities encountered on field. A sensitivity analysis of the MLE from a given zone located in the middle of the COX layer was performed by perturbing the hydraulic conductivities and porosities values in fourteen hydrogeological formations. The uncertain permeability-porosity parameters in the aquifer formations from Bathonian in the Dogger sequence, and Rauracian-Sequanian in the Oxfordian sequence, have strong and rather non-linear effects on the variability of the output response of interest.
    The methodologies for UP and GSA employed in the present thesis have proved to be very efficient when applied to large hydrogeological models of groundwater flow and MLE. In particular, quasi-random sampling methods offer a flexible frame for providing the uncertainty distribution of the output response of interest at low computational costs. Screening techniques provide a fast estimation for the overall contribution of each input variable to the variability of the output. Meta-modelling techniques such as PCE proved highly accurate in individualising the low- and high-order effects of each input variable upon the output response of interest.