Faculté des sciences

An anatomical investigation of the cervicothoracic ganglion

Marcer, Nicholas ; Bergmann, Mathias. ; Klie, A. ; Moor, B. ; Djonov, Valentin

In: Clinical Anatomy, 2011, p. -

Anatomical variability within the autonomic nervous system has long been accepted. This study evaluated the anatomical variability of the cervicothoracic ganglion (CTG) according to its form and, in addition, provided precise measurements between the CTG and the anterior tubercle of the transverse process of the sixth cervical vertebra (C6TP), the first costovertebral articulation, and the... Plus

Ajouter à la liste personnelle
    Summary
    Anatomical variability within the autonomic nervous system has long been accepted. This study evaluated the anatomical variability of the cervicothoracic ganglion (CTG) according to its form and, in addition, provided precise measurements between the CTG and the anterior tubercle of the transverse process of the sixth cervical vertebra (C6TP), the first costovertebral articulation, and the vertebral artery. Forty-two adult cadavers were dissected, 22 male and 20 females. Five main forms of CTG were documented; spindle (31.9%), dumbbell (23.2%), truncated (21.7%), perforated (14.5%), and inverted-L (8.7%). The means for length, width, and thickness of the CTG were 18.5 mm, 8.2 mm, and 4.5 mm, respectively. The dimensions were found to be slightly larger in the males than females and on the left sides as compared to the right. The mean shortest distance between the CTGs and the vertebral artery was found to be 2.8 mm, whilst the mean shortest distances to C6TP was 25.7 mm and to the first costovertebral articulation was 1.7 mm. There is great variability in the morphology of the CTG with five common forms consistently seen. The relation to the vertebral artery may influence the form of the ganglion. Two previously undocumented forms are recorded; the truncated which describes the important juxtaposition of the CTG and the vertebral artery and the perforated which describes the piercing of the ganglion itself by the artery. The findings are considered to be of clinical importance to anesthetists, surgeons, neurosurgeons, and anatomists.