Faculté des sciences

Three-dimensional high resolution fluvio-glacial aquifer analog - Part 1: Field study

Bayer, P. ; Huggenberger, P. ; Renard, Philippe ; Comunian, Alessandro

In: Journal of Hydrology, 2011, vol. 405, no. 1, p. 1

Describing the complex structures that exist in many sedimentary aquifers is crucial for reliable groundwater flow and transport simulation. However, hardly any aquifer can be inspected in such detail that all decimeter to meter heterogeneity is resolved. Aquifer analogs serve as surrogates to construct models of equivalent heterogeneity, and thus imitate those features relevant for flow or... Plus

Ajouter à la liste personnelle
    Summary
    Describing the complex structures that exist in many sedimentary aquifers is crucial for reliable groundwater flow and transport simulation. However, hardly any aquifer can be inspected in such detail that all decimeter to meter heterogeneity is resolved. Aquifer analogs serve as surrogates to construct models of equivalent heterogeneity, and thus imitate those features relevant for flow or transport processes. Gravel pits found in excavation show excellent sections of the sedimentary sequence and thus offer direct insight into the structural and textural composition of the subsoil. This paper describes an approach to also inspect the third dimension: by mapping during the ongoing excavation it is possible to obtain a three-dimensional representation of the subsurface within a short period of time. A detailed description of a case study is presented and the findings from sedimentological, hydrogeological and geophysical analyses are compared. The gravel pit is located near the town of Herten in southwest Germany, where relatively young unconsolidated fluvio-glacial and fluvial sediments in the Rhine basin are mined. The excavated gravel body is built up by architectural elements typical for braided river deposits. The study generated a high-resolution data set of lithofacies, hydrofacies and ground penetrating radar (GPR) profiles. It represents the basis for a full three-dimensional geostatistical reconstruction presented in the second part.