Faculté des sciences

The thermic effect of sugar-free Red Bull: Do the non-caffeine bioactive ingredients in energy drinks play a role?

Miles-Chan, Jennifer L. ; Charrière, Nathalie ; Grasser, Erik K ; Montani, Jean-Pierre ; Dulloo, Abdul G

In: Obesity, 2015, vol. 23, no. 1, p. 16–19

Objective: Consumption of energy drinks is increasing amongst athletes and the general public. By virtue of their bioactive ingredients (including caffeine, taurine, glucuronolactone, and B-group vitamins) and paucity of calories, sugar-free “diet” versions of these drinks could be a useful aid for weight maintenance. Yet little is known about the acute influence of these drinks, and... Plus

Ajouter à la liste personnelle
    Summary
    Objective: Consumption of energy drinks is increasing amongst athletes and the general public. By virtue of their bioactive ingredients (including caffeine, taurine, glucuronolactone, and B-group vitamins) and paucity of calories, sugar-free “diet” versions of these drinks could be a useful aid for weight maintenance. Yet little is known about the acute influence of these drinks, and specifically the role of the cocktail of non-caffeine ingredients, on resting energy expenditure (REE) and substrate oxidation. Therefore, the metabolic impact of sugar-free Red Bull (sfRB) to a comparable amount of caffeine was compared.Methods: REE and respiratory quotient (RQ) were measured in eight healthy young men by ventilated-hood indirect calorimetry for 30 min baseline and 2 h following ingestion of 355 ml of either: sfRB + placebo, water + 120 mg caffeine, or water + placebo, according to a randomized cross-over design.Results: sfRB and water + caffeine both increased REE to the same degree (+4%). Additionally, sfRB briefly increased RQ. Water + caffeine had no effect on RQ relative to water + placebo.Conclusions: sfRB enhanced thermogenesis and marginally shifted RQ to favor carbohydrate oxidation. The stimulatory effects of sfRB on REE are mimicked by water + caffeine, indicating that the auxiliary ingredients do not influence this thermic effect. The metabolic effects of sfRB are primarily due to caffeine alone.