000023207 001__ 23207
000023207 005__ 20131002113938.0
000023207 0248_ $$aoai:doc.rero.ch:20110609104742-VC$$punifr$$ppostprint$$prero_explore$$zcdu34$$zthesis_urn$$zreport$$zthesis$$zbook$$zjournal$$zcdu574$$zcdu16$$zpreprint$$zcdu1$$zdissertation
000023207 041__ $$aeng
000023207 080__ $$a574
000023207 100__ $$aSchaffner, Urs$$uCABI Europe-Switzerland, Delémont, Switzerland -
000023207 245__ $$9eng$$aPlant invasions, generalist herbivores, and novel defense weapons
000023207 520__ $$9eng$$aOne commonly accepted mechanism for biological invasions is that species, after introduction to a new region, leave behind their natural enemies and therefore increase in distribution and abundance. However, which enemies are escaped remains unclear. Escape from specialist invertebrate herbivores has been examined in detail, but despite the profound effects of generalist herbivores in natural communities their potential to control invasive species is poorly understood. We carried out parallel laboratory feeding bioassays with generalist invertebrate herbivores from the native (Europe) and from the introduced (North America) range using native and nonnative tetraploid populations of the invasive spotted knapweed, Centaurea stoebe. We found that the growth of North American generalist herbivores was far lower when feeding on C. stoebe than the growth of European generalists. In contrast, North American and European generalists grew equally well on European and North American tetraploid C. stoebe plants, lending no support for an evolutionary change in resistance of North American tetraploid C. stoebe populations against generalist herbivores. These results suggest that biogeographical differences in the response of generalist herbivores to novel plant species have the potential to affect plant invasions.
000023207 695__ $$9eng$$abiological invasions ; biotic resistance ; enemy release ; evolution of increased competitive ability ; herbivorous invertebrates ; novel associations ; plant–herbivore interactions
000023207 700__ $$aRidenour, Wendy M.$$uDivision of Biological Sciences, The University of Montana, Missoula, USA
000023207 700__ $$aWolf, Vera C.$$uDepartment of Chemical Ecology, Bielefeld University, Germany
000023207 700__ $$aBassett, Thomas$$uDivision of Biological Sciences, The University of Montana, Missoula, USA
000023207 700__ $$aMüller, Caroline$$uDepartment of Chemical Ecology, Bielefeld University, Germany
000023207 700__ $$aMüller-Schärer, Heinz$$uDepartment of Biology, Ecology and Evolution, University of Fribourg, Switzerland
000023207 700__ $$aSutherland, Steve$$uFire Sciences Laboratory, Rocky Mountain Research Station, USDA Forest Service, Missoula, USA
000023207 700__ $$aLortie, Christopher J.$$uDepartment of Biology, York University, Toronto, Canada
000023207 700__ $$aCallaway, Ragan M.$$uDivision of Biological Sciences, The University of Montana, Missoula, USA
000023207 773__ $$g2011/92/4/829-835$$tEcology
000023207 775__ $$gPublished version$$ohttp://dx.doi.org/10.1890/10-1230.1
000023207 8564_ $$uhttp://www.esapubs.org/archive/ecol/E092/071/$$y2011-06-14 09:34:49$$zAppendices
000023207 8564_ $$fsch_pig.pdf$$qapplication/pdf$$s207949$$uhttp://doc.rero.ch/record/23207/files/sch_pig.pdf$$yorder:1$$zpdf
000023207 918__ $$aFaculté des sciences$$bDécanat, Ch. du Musée 6A, 1700 Fribourg$$cBiologie
000023207 919__ $$aUniversité de Fribourg$$bFribourg$$ddoc.support@rero.ch
000023207 980__ $$aPOSTPRINT$$bUNIFR$$fART_JOURNAL
000023207 990__ $$a20110609104742-VC