Faculté des lettres

Friend or foe? : value preferences and the association between intergroup relations and out-group attitudes and perceptions

Eicher, Véronique ; Perrez, Meinrad (Dir.)

Thèse de doctorat : Université de Fribourg, 2010.

The aim of this dissertation thesis was to analyze the values, out-group attitudes and perceptions of Israeli, Palestinian, American and Swiss students. The Israeli-Palestinian conflict has been going on for several decades and it is therefore important to understand the values and mutual perceptions of the groups in conflict, as well as of third parties and bystanders. The first major focus of... Plus

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    Summary
    The aim of this dissertation thesis was to analyze the values, out-group attitudes and perceptions of Israeli, Palestinian, American and Swiss students. The Israeli-Palestinian conflict has been going on for several decades and it is therefore important to understand the values and mutual perceptions of the groups in conflict, as well as of third parties and bystanders. The first major focus of the thesis was the investigation of value preferences and perceived in-group homogeneity of students living in conflict environments (i.e., Israelis and Palestinians) as well as students living in relatively safe environments (i.e., Americans and Swiss). It was shown that Palestinians exhibited the expected ‘conflict value pattern’ (i.e., valuing Security and Conformity highly and rating Self-Direction, Stimulation, and Hedonism as unimportant) and perceived their in-group members to be very similar. Swiss students confirmed the assumptions for people living in safe environments, while American and Israeli students did neither show the ‘conflict’ nor the ‘non-conflict’ pattern. The second focus of the thesis lay on the association between intergroup relations and out-group attitudes and perceptions. It was shown that allied groups (i.e., Americans and Israelis) like each other, see each other accurately and project key values (i.e., Power, and Security) positively onto each other, while enemy groups (i.e., Israelis and Palestinians) dislike each other, do not see each other accurately and project key values negatively onto each other. These results show that the relations between groups do not only affect out-group attitudes, but also influence how accurate and similar other groups are seen to oneself.