Faculté des sciences

Earthworm, mycorrhiza and root interactions: their effects on some chemical, physical and biological soil properties

Milleret, Roxane ; Le Bayon, Renée-Claire ; Tarnawski, Sonia ; Boivin, P. ; Gobat, Jean-Michel

In: Bulletin de la Société Suisse de Pédologie, 2010, vol. 30, p. 81-83

The belowground communities include a large variety of soil organisms showing highly complex interactions. Among the great diversity of soil biota, plant roots, earthworms, and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) that form a symbiosis with plant roots, are key components. However, only few studies tried to assess the individual or interactive effects of these soil organisms on soil properties and... Plus

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    Summary
    The belowground communities include a large variety of soil organisms showing highly complex interactions. Among the great diversity of soil biota, plant roots, earthworms, and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) that form a symbiosis with plant roots, are key components. However, only few studies tried to assess the individual or interactive effects of these soil organisms on soil properties and how they influence plant growth. Two experiments have been performed in order to test the influence of the three organisms on soil chemical, physical and biological (bacterial community structure) properties). The chemical soil properties were mainly influenced by plant roots and AMF (increased phosphorus uptake by the roots), the physical properties by plant roots (greater structural stability) and earthworms (lower structural stability), and bacterial structures by all organisms. Generally, AMF positively affected shoot and/or root biomass whereas earthworms had no significant effect on plant growth.