Faculté des sciences

Beneficial effect of insulin-like growth factor-1 on hypoxemic renal dysfunction in the newborn rabbit

Prévot, Anne ; Julita, Monique ; Tung, David K. ; Mosig, Dolores

In: Pediatric Nephrology, 2009, vol. 24, no. 5, p. 973-981

Acute normocapnic hypoxemia can cause functional renal insufficiency by increasing renal vascular resistance (RVR), leading to renal hypoperfusion and decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) activity is low in fetuses and newborns and further decreases during hypoxia. IGF-1 administration to humans and adult animals induces pre- and postglomerular... Plus

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    Summary
    Acute normocapnic hypoxemia can cause functional renal insufficiency by increasing renal vascular resistance (RVR), leading to renal hypoperfusion and decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) activity is low in fetuses and newborns and further decreases during hypoxia. IGF-1 administration to humans and adult animals induces pre- and postglomerular vasodilation, thereby increasing GFR and renal blood flow (RBF). A potential protective effect of IGF-1 on renal function was evaluated in newborn rabbits with hypoxemia-induced renal insufficiency. Renal function and hemodynamic parameters were assessed in 17 anesthetized and mechanically ventilated newborn rabbits. After hypoxemia stabilization, saline solution (time control) or IGF-1 (1 mg/kg) was given as an intravenous (i.v.) bolus, and renal function was determined for six 30-min periods. Normocapnic hypoxemia significantly increased RVR (+16%), leading to decreased GFR (−14%), RBF (−19%) and diuresis (−12%), with an increased filtration fraction (FF). Saline solution resulted in a worsening of parameters affected by hypoxemia. Contrarily, although mean blood pressure decreased slightly but significantly, IGF-1 prevented a further increase in RVR, with subsequent improvement of GFR, RBF and diuresis. FF indicated relative postglomerular vasodilation. Although hypoxemia-induced acute renal failure was not completely prevented, IGF-1 elicited efferent vasodilation, thereby precluding a further decline in renal function.