Faculté des sciences

Integrating collocated auxiliary parameters in geostatistical simulations using joint probability distributions and probability aggregation

Renard, Philippe ; Mariethoz, Grégoire ; Froidevaux, Roland

In: Water Resources Research, 2009, vol. 45, no. W08421, p. 1-13

We propose a new cosimulation algorithm for simulating a primary attribute using one or several secondary attributes known exhaustively on the domain. This problem is frequently encountered in surface and groundwater hydrology when a variable of interest is measured only at a discrete number of locations and when the secondary variable is mapped by indirect techniques such as geophysics or remote... Plus

Ajouter à la liste personnelle
    Summary
    We propose a new cosimulation algorithm for simulating a primary attribute using one or several secondary attributes known exhaustively on the domain. This problem is frequently encountered in surface and groundwater hydrology when a variable of interest is measured only at a discrete number of locations and when the secondary variable is mapped by indirect techniques such as geophysics or remote sensing. In the proposed approach, the correlation between the two variables is modeled by a joint probability distribution function. A technique to construct such relation using underlying variables and physical laws is proposed when field data are insufficient. The simulation algorithm proceeds sequentially. At each location of the domain, two conditional probability distribution functions (cpdf) are inferred. The cpdf of the main attribute is inferred in a classical way from the neighboring data and a model of spatial variability. The second cpdf is inferred directly from the joint probability distribution function of the two attributes and the value of the secondary attribute at the location to be simulated. The two distribution functions are combined by probability aggregation to obtain the local cpdf from which a value for the primary attribute is randomly drawn. Various examples using synthetic and remote sensing data demonstrate that the method is more accurate than the classical collocated cosimulation technique when a complex relation relates the two attributes.